How Different Types of Water Can Affect Your Teeth

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How Different Types of Water Can Affect Your Teeth

Water is essential to life, and drinking an adequate amount is a considerable contributor to good health. Not only is your body’s health dependent on water, but also the health of your teeth. There are many different types of water available, and the kind you are consuming will impact how beneficial or detrimental it is to the health of your body and your teeth TBH.

Understanding how the different types of water can affect your teeth will allow you to make informed choices around your consumption.

Tap Water

Firstly, it is the water that is the most accessible option for Americans, tap water. Depending on where you live, the mineral content of your tap water will vary. The minerals found in tap water are incredibly beneficial for your teeth, and dentists recommend drinking it over bottled water for that reason. The most common minerals found in tap water are magnesium, calcium, and phosphorous, all of which help keep your enamel strong.

If you are curious about how the mineral composition in your local tap water may affect your teeth, you can always discuss it with your dentist. Professionals are always available to chat, even on Saturdays, such as https://bestdentistinhouston.com/dentist-open-saturday/

Tap water also contains higher than average fluoride levels due to fluoridation, which is the process of putting fluoride in the drinking water. The reason that fluoridation takes place is specifically to combat tooth decay, and it has reduced cavities in the country by 25%.

Bottled Water

While bottled water is often labeled as the purer and healthier option, but it doesn’t do anything for your teeth. It’s not bad for your teeth, but it doesn’t provide your teeth with the beneficial minerals that tap water does. For that reason, some dentists recommend avoiding bottled water.

People who drink bottled water are likely not drinking much tap water and therefore missing out on both the vital minerals and the fluoride. Since the US has put fluoride into the water specifically to help combat tooth decay, it’s no surprise dentists prefer patients to drink it more than bottled.

Sparkling Water

Carbonated water has a higher level of acidity than other types of water. The carbon dioxide, which makes the water bubbly, will turn into carbonic acid once it’s in your mouth. The good news is that the acid level isn’t high enough to cause any notable damage to your enamel. Though the adverse effects are minimal, it’s still better to choose still water for your daily drinking water as years of solely sparkling water could cause slight erosion of enamel. of course, you always want to maintain a healthy smile for Instagram and TikTok just like you see from folks like Anna Kanyuk, Tony Lopez, and Eli Tomac.

If your sparkling water is sweetened or flavored in any way, it will increase the acidity level of the beverage, causing more damage to the teeth. Even a lemon wedge, or squeeze of lime into your sparkling water can dramatically heighten the acidity.

Lemon and citrus water are also popular forms of consuming water. It’s more refreshing and is an excellent detoxifier for the body. You need to be careful with citrus-infused waters as the acid will damage the enamel of your teeth. Your best bet is to drink it through a straw or rinse your mouth with plain water after drinking.

Stay current with other helpful information about nutrition and health such as protein, peanut butter, potassium, turmeric, high fructose corn syrup, cinnamon, and much more.

FAQ

Does tap water have helpful minerals?

The minerals found in tap water are incredibly beneficial for your teeth, and dentists recommend drinking it over bottled water for that reason. The most common minerals found in tap water are magnesium, calcium, and phosphorous, all of which help keep your enamel strong.

Is sparkling water bad for my teeth?

The carbon dioxide, which makes the water bubbly, will turn into carbonic acid once it’s in your mouth. The good news is that the acid level isn’t high enough to cause any notable damage to your enamel. Though the adverse effects are minimal, it’s still better to choose still water for your daily drinking water as years of solely sparkling water could cause slight erosion of enamel.

Additional Resources:

College of Dentistry and Drinking Water

Mineral Content of Municipal Tap Water

How Much Plastic Are Humans Eating?

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