Murphy Law Facts

Murphy’s Law is a witticism which states that ‘anything that can possibly go wrong will go wrong’. The Law came into recognition at the Edward’s Air force Base at North Base in 1949. It was named after Captain Edward Murphy, who had been working on an Air Force Project MX981, which was designed to see the level of deceleration one can stand during an air crash. During a particular incident, after discovering a faulty wiring of transducer, Murphy cursed the technician responsible by saying “If there is any way to do it wrong, he will find it.” The contractor’s project manager, who kept a list of all the laws, named this one as ‘Murphy’s Law’. Murphy hated when someone used his name for absurd theories of “Why does buttered bread always land butter-side down?” He was the victim of his own Law.
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4 Comments on “Murphy Law Facts”

  1. It may have been Murpy’s Law in the US since 1949, but in the UK it’s been known as “Sod’s Law” for hundreds of years, (Sod = Earth).
    Before then, things that went wrong and blamed on anyone, or even no one in particular was called the “Evil Eye”.
    Monarchs in the UK would employ a court jester to ridicule people, including the monarch, to offset the effects of the evil eye, or as we now know, when “sod’s law was around. As it happens to everyone on the planet, not just the US Air Force, I would love to see it studied properly. I have enquired of many people and seen first hand accounts of people being killed by being in the wrong place, at the wrong time, within the range of a split second. It normally happens when people change a long standing routine that things will go wrong.

  2. Well designed parts are made so they can only be installed the correct way. We have machinery in our company that follows this and those are great to work on. On the other hand we have a very large piece of equipment with a hydraulic motor in the middle of it. The valve plate inside of the motor can be installed upside down, has no label indicating ‘this side out’, no caution in the instructions, and only after reassembly of the whole machine so the motor could tested did we find out it would not run. About two hours of factor phone support got us to a senior tech who said, ‘Well the valve plate must be upside down!’ And it was.

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